STILL LIFE

Showing 1–16 of 28 results

  • Apples in a Basket

    I wonder how many apples I have painted?  These small Gala’s fitted just perfectly into the beautifully crafted basket which I have to point out, is pretty tricky to paint.  The interweaving willows made me think of the Islamic patterns that I had copied in Morocco.  To add a sense of the basket’s form turning into darker space of the background simply added an extra complexity – and strings of paint colours on my palette.  But all this is eclipsed by the simplicity of the apples and particularly by the almost sculptural grace with which the single apple holds its leaves.  For me there is a feeling of it sitting in perfect space on the warmly coloured wooden board, basking in the glory of being painted.  

    Oil on canvas  2015  30.5 x 36cm 12 x 14in

  • Autumn Colours

    Autumn Colours

    £425

    A colourful oil painting of pears, apples and quince with alla prima feel to the brush strokes .  Set upon a table top there is a Classical Realist feel to the still life composition. The palette has warm vivid autumn yellows, golds, reds and oranges.  Usually these paint colours are composed of Cadmiums yet here is a mix of vibrant modern pigments such as Quinacridone Rose, Arylide Yellow,  Phthalocyanine Green .  All these are remarkably vivid and allow a rich play of opacity and transparency to enliven the canvas.  The frame is a simple squared moulding which slopes into the painting, draw us in.  The painting was made as part of one of Paul Foxton’s online workshops that began in lockdown.  Oil on panel  2021   28 x 41cm 11 x 16in   Frame colour – Farrow & Ball yellow (Babouche)

  • Blue Bottle, Lemon and Dish

    £475

    An open door allows natural light to illuminate the pale background casting shadows on the table top and putting half the small dish into shade.  The fabric is pulled back as if it were a curtain.  Like Majolica Plate, you can see the interplay of a real lemon with a painted version.   The smooth curve of the bowl with patterns of leaves and small red/orange swirls accentuates its shape, the spiral of the half peeled lemon repeats the swirl pattern

    Oil on linen panel  2015   44 x 39cm  17 x 15in

  • Blue Cup with Basket of Sprouting Onions

    This is the first of many Cup Paintings.  I bought two of these attractive, contemporary cups in Florence – one grass green, and one traffic light red – during my time at the Angel Academy where I was a student on the Four Year Classical Realism Program (January 2010 – December 2013).  Then back in England some years later I bought more colours online from Germany where they are made.  And I shall paint each and every one!  Just search ‘cups’  on this website to find them as the collection grows.  The wonderful sprouting red onions are what we artists call ‘Perishables’ and they need a particular way to be painted.  And of course now these ones are only available to enjoy in the painting.

    Oil on canvas 

    2018  40 x 50cm   16 x 20in

  • Blue Delft Vase, Chinese Plate and Pears

    Still lives often tell stories and here is part of this painting’s story.  It is based on the favourite theme – Blue and White.  The small delft vase came from the Midhurst Antiques Market with a fascinating article on Delft Wear tucked inside  It tells us that most Delft designs are characteristic scenes of Dutch life and landscape often taken from old factory pattern books made at the Royal Makkum Factory who have been producing tiles since 1650.  The white opaque tin glaze acts as a background for the blue decoration.  It became so popular that factories sprung up in England and are still going strong. The plate however I bought in Florence and was told that it is Chinese and was certainly made for export to Europe.  This is part of a story of this still life which was on my easel when someone saw something they liked very much.   They bought it before it was finished.  And now have it in their house where it is in just the right place and so its provenance grows.

    Oil on linen  2015  45 x 65cm  18 x 26in

  • Box of Apples

    Shadow boxes are used for controlling light and creating a dark space.   When this small box was sent with an order of paints I put it on my shelf of still life candidates, I liked it.  As you see the basket fits it exactly. Apples are a highly popular subject for still life painters and the linen cloth gives an abstract reminder of something square – the box opening – but collapsed, folded.  There is an initial drawing and this little painting.  Framed in deep red it can work as a colourful brick, slotting into the most surprising places.  Or because of the shape of the frame it can stand on a flat surface as many of the small paintings can.

    Oil on panel  2020  23 x 30cm  9 x 12in

  • Brass three-legged dish with Chinese Plate

    Oil on linen 2018

    50 x 70 cm

  • Brown Coffee Pot, Poppies and Red Cup

    £650

    Oil on panel

    2022 49 x 49cm  20 x 20in

  • Coffee Pot with Red Cup

    A glossy brown coffee pot is half seen, a deep red cup is placed almost centre stage, both these glazed objects are smooth and shiny contrasting against a small bunch of white flowers and a rather dramatic frilled begonia.  

    This was the second cup to be painted.  See where we go with this idea as there are a number of new cups, and will be more in the future. 

    Oil on panel  2019  30 x 33cm   12 x 13in 

  • Davenport Jug and Shallots

    £1,500

    This larger painting harks back to Peaches and Small Jug.  We do in fact have two of these jugs, one small and this one that stands 15 cm (6”) high.  As it is larger, there is more detail giving it a slightly different character.  My preference is to paint things in still lives larger than life,  I don’t know if this reminds me of seeing the world newly as a young child when most things were larger or at least many things seem smaller as one reflects on them as an adult.  Whatever the reason, I like this apparent magnification and here, on the lovely handmade bricks and with an orderly arrangement of shallots, the jug is carved out of the dark background but also melts into it where it is in shadow.  This is a simple composition with few things and it is here that I often find a magic that gives arrangements a particular vibrancy and balance.  There is no formula and it takes a bit of patience arranging and rearranging, changing lighting, going away and returning with a fresh eye, until I get almost too exasperated and just have to begin.  Or at least make the initial graphite drawing to check the underlying structure has unity and impact. 

    Oil on panel  2020   59 x 67cm  23 x 26in

  • Egg 1

    £250

    First eggs study in a series of paintings exploring some of the external features of eggs – texture, variation in colour and markings which are heightened against the simplicity of the pastel background.  All four worked well together but now that three are sold it seems like a good idea to paint some more.  A very small change in the composition will give a new character to the little paintings.  Pheasant or quail’s eggs could well be contenders.

    Oil on panel   2020   20 x 20cm   8 x 8in

  • Figs

    £1,500

    A perishable painting !  Now what does that mean?  The beautiful small green figs are only available at the Mercato di Sant’ Ambrogio in Florence for the month of September hence their name ‘Settembrini’  or Little Septembers.  And every few days I had to go and replenish stocks as the fragile fruit seemed to melt leaving strange silhoutted outlines on the simple brass plate that we found in an Antiques Shop or Brocante antichità in Via Cimabue close by.  But returning briefly to the idea of perishables – in painting terms each figs did not last long enough to be painted to a finish.  An unusual strategy is used, laying out the composition and giving things a simple form, then finishing each fig by working on it non-stop until it is done.  The next day won’t do – the paint will be too dry to work on, and one has to start again with a new fig.

    But somethings I can’t explain, why this joyful frame was a perfect choice and how it is that these figs simply glow with a simple glorious wonder.

    Oil on linen   2013  46 x 66cm  18 x 26in   Bespoke Florentine Frame

  • Four Apples

    £1,250

    Apples are surely one of the most painted fruit and as a subject, their simple shape and glorious colours are a delight to work with.  In this painting I wanted to bring light into the composition by using different illumination.  Dark backgrounds are typical of the Atelier system and have a dramatic impact, by changing this I thought of the work as a landscape and studied how the light would bounce onto the objects.  The carved wooden moulding was not in the foreground but as I worked there seemed to be little feeling of space to the painting. Its addition brought an extra dimension and volume and was a fascinating technical challenge.

    Oil on linen 2017   59 x 67cm   23 x 26in

  • Grapes and Red Wine

    £1,500

    One of those subjects that will always be popular.  Using some lovely purple vine leaves curved around a simple green glass, a fine ‘bottle of red’ and some gorgeous black grapes all set on a set of some very fine hand-made bricks, it is hard to translate the smoke and mirrors of the studio arrangements.  A wooden stool stacked up with several paint cans held bucket with a large spray of vine leaves which were wired into a slightly unwilling, but generous sweeping arch.  At times the lighting, that is always needed for a Tenebrist style Still Life, had to be used to coax the leave arch into this even parade directed forwards but still needing the occasional use of extra florists tape.  And when it was finally finished it was transported very carefully to Florence where we chose this hand-carved frame which was, painted, gilded and aged by our very favourite artesian Corniciaio (framer).  Then equally carefully returned home to the UK. 

    Oil on linen  2016   71 x 68cm   28 x 27in   Bespoke Florentine Frame

  • Green Cup, Limes with Hellebores

    The lime cup appears as part of a green painting.  Begun in January when good limes are scarce but hellebores are plentiful.  The bottle is part of a small collection I have been given.  This one is particularly lovely with the colours of the fruit and flowers reflected within it and looking almost like a butterfly’s wings.

  • Incense Burner

    Oil on panel

    2019